juvenile justice in the news


School Discipline Debate Reignited by New Los Angeles Data | JJIE.org: "As a national debate heats up over appropriate student discipline, new data from Los Angeles reveal that school police there issued more than 33,500 court summonses to youths between 10 and 18 in three years — with more than 40 percent of those tickets going to children 14 and younger.   ...
Zipperman said “a citation is an educational tool,” and so it is expected that middle-school students will receive more citations than older students. He also noted that overall citations were “trending down over the past three years,” with African American students’ citations “trending lower” and white and Latino students’ citations rising in proportion.

Alternatives to Youth Detention Conference Opens in Houston | JJIE.org:
"Texas State Senator John Whitmire came to the podium last night at the opening of the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) conference in Houston and got right to the core work of the JDAI. Five years ago, he said, 5,000 youth in Texas were incarcerated at any one time. Today the number is down to 1,500. It has happened, he said, without compromising public safety."
... 
This conference follows on the heels of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s Kids Behind Bars national symposium for journalists, where a sense of optimism seemed to prevail that this is an era for positive change for the juvenile justice. That’s the prevailing mode at the JDAI conference also.

However, as Whitmire, a conservative Democrat, pointed out, there is plenty of work to be done. His own focus is on decriminalizing truancy in schools and preventing kids from getting charged for disorderly conduct “for behavior that you and I would have had on our resumes.”


Day Two: John Jay Juvenile Justice Conference | JJIE.org
"Professor Heitzeg explained that the school-to-prison pipeline is essentially a growing trend that involves tracking kids out of school and into the criminal justice system. There are, she argues, several reasons for this growing trend, including the re-segregation of schools, growing poverty rates, the over representation of kids of color in special education classes, the underrepresentation of kids in advanced classes and zero tolerance policies.

She said that zero tolerance policies being implemented in schools have increased, while at the same time, violence in schools has fallen across the nation.

Zero tolerance policies have resulted in some three million suspensions and 100,000 expulsions per year."    


Bart Lubow: Cutting Youth Incarceration Doesn’t Cut Public Safety | JJIE.org
"Reading from these prepared remarks, he said: “Evidence is mounting from all parts of the country that policy makers, justice system practitioners and whole communities are prepared to eschew the policies of mass incarceration that have been at the center of crime policy for the past four decades. This shift is not restricted to Democratic or Republican states, or to specific sections of the country. It is increasingly embraced by people and organizations of all political persuasions.”

He added: “It is at least a portent of a different future, one that recognizes that mass incarceration has proven a fiscally unsustainable approach to public safety that maintains and exacerbates racial and ethnic disadvantages, disrupts families, undermines communities and disregards new knowledge about how to respond more effectively to crime.”"    


'We can't arrest our way out' of youth violence issue, Detroit police chief says | The Detroit News | detroitnews.com
""We can't arrest our way out of this problem," Detroit Police Chief Ralph Godbee said during testimony at a hearing for U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence in Detroit, held at Wayne State University. "We can't be selfish and say we just need more police officers to fight this problem. Of course, we need more officers, but making more arrests isn't the solution. If every tool in your toolbox is a hammer, then everything becomes a nail. There are environmental factors that contribute to these problems."   'via Blog this'

Slideshow of kids in the Juvenile Justice system by Richard Ross
Remarkable photographs on display at the conference in Houston


previous posts
blaming families, juvenile justice edition

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