Chomsky's alternative education

By United States Postal Service, scanned by Sebjarod
 [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
A good interview with Professor Noam Chomsky is up at the New Left Project. Note that Chomsky talks of his own unique experience attending a Deweyite school as well as his frustration with schools and the mindset they assume and impose. Lots of insights and thoughts on mass education in the interview and worth a read.

New Left Project | Articles | Work, Learning and Freedom: In this often personal interview, renowned linguist and political commentator Noam Chomsky outlines a libertarian perspective on work and education, arguing that freedom is the root of creativity and fulfillment. 

"Children for example are naturally curious – they want to know about everything, they want to explore everything but that generally gets knocked out of their heads. They're put into disciplined structures, things are organised for them to act in certain ways so it tends to get beaten out of you. That's why school's boring. School can be exciting. It happens that I went to a Deweyite school until I was about 12. It was an exciting experience, you wanted to be there, you wanted to go. There was no ranking, there were no grades. Things were guided so it wasn't just do anything you feel like. There was a structure but you were basically encouraged to pursue your own interests and concerns and to work together with others.  I basically didn't know I was a good student until I got to high school. I went to an academic high school in which everybody was ranked and you had to get to college so you had to pass tests. In elementary school I had actually skipped a year but nobody paid much attention to it. The only thing I saw was that I was the smallest kid in the class. But it wasn't a big thing that anybody paid attention to. High school was totally different – you've gotta be first in the class, not second. And that's a very destructive environment – it drives people into the situation where you really don't know what you want to do. It happened to me in fact – in high school I kinda lost all interest. When I looked at the college catalogue it was really exciting – lots of courses, great things. But it turned out that the college was like an overgrown high school. After about a year I was going to just drop out and it was just by accident that I stayed in. I happened to meet up with a faculty member who suggested to me I start taking his graduate courses and then I started taking other graduate courses. But I have no professional training. That's why I'm teaching at MIT – I don't have the credentials to teach at an academic university."


Note: On the surprising credential remark above, I couldn't find much in Wikipedia or in many other bios online but I found this mysterious bit (my bold):
Noam Chomsky Biography - Facts, Birthday, Life Story - Biography.com: "Just as World War II was coming to a close, Chomsky began his studies at the University of Pennsylvania. He found little use for his classes until he met Zellig S. Harris, an American scholar touted for discovering structural linguistics (breaking language down into distinct parts or levels). Chomsky was moved by what he felt language could reveal about society. Harris was moved by Chomsky’s great potential and did much to advance the young man’s undergraduate studies, with Chomsky receiving his B.A. and M.A in nontraditional modes of study."

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