links 8-28-12


Average Tuition & Fees, by Institution Type, 1980-81 to 2010-11 | Demos:



As state funding for higher education steadily declined as a portion of colleges’ revenue, colleges raised tuition to make up for the gap—a major reason why tuition at public colleges more than tripled since 1980. This financial change left students to absorb more of the costs by taking on student debt and working long hours while in school. Unsurprisingly, financial barriers are the number one reason students cite for dropping out.

Jonathan Kozol Book Tour: "For decades, Jonathan Kozol has been a voice for education equity and justice. His writing about schools and children’s lives is filled with insight, compassion, warmth, and a fierce critique of racial bias. "


Why Do Colleges Compete by Becoming More Expensive? -: "
How do the colleges compete? By spending more on such things as luxury dorms, elaborate sports facilities, and increasing their recruiting staffs (and sending them around the world in search for full-pay foreign students). And, above all, by discounting tuition with financial aid they cannot afford to give. The net result is that the colleges’ expenses go up, their revenues go down, and tuitions are driven even higher."

5 ways to flip school « Cooperative Catalyst:
This is a companion piece to “5 ways to flip composition” on the Democratizing Composition blog, a new project meant to build a community around the idea of broadening what’s possible in schools through specific new media methods and materials.


DaysHomeschooling Parents Cry Foul Over New Rules From the Department of Ed | Seven Days   
The New Haven couple is among a growing number of Vermont parents who are opting to educate their children themselves. And, like many of their fellow stay-at-home teachers, they’re up in arms about a July 23 memo from Vermont Education Commissioner Armando Vilaseca that seeks to clarify the rules for the alternative form of education also known as “home study.”

Homeschool Review: "David Albert addresses these issues head on in his latest book, Dismantling the Inner School: Homeschooling and the Curriculum of Abundance (Hunt Press 2012). In a series of essays, David argues that we parents need to remove the bricks that "block us from true, natural learning," and understand that children start learning from the moment they start living. Learning is a natural response to life, but school is designed to undermine and subvert this innate desire, preventing children from experiencing with all their senses, which is originally how we learn."

Quality Education is Possible: "As mentioned in my blog from October 19, 2011 regarding overcoming boredom and challenging assumptions, Project-Based Learning (PBL) is one approach with positive results in engaging students in the learning process, increasing motivation and improving performance in school. For students in such programs, going to school means working on real world problems, such as building and racing electric cars, snorkeling to survey coral reefs or advancing research on single-celled organisms. The video above [below] provides a glimpse of Project-Based Learning in action."

Seymour Papert appears in the video:



Raising the Ritalin Generation - NYTimes.com

I REMEMBER the moment my son’s teacher told us, “Just a little medication could really turn things around for Will.” We stared at her as if she were speaking Greek.

“Are you talking about Ritalin?” my husband asked.

Will was in third grade, and his school wanted him to settle down in order to focus on math worksheets and geography lessons and social studies. The children were expected to line up quietly and “transition” between classes without goofing around. This posed a challenge — hence the medication.

"Will was in third grade, and his school wanted him to settle down in order to focus on math worksheets and geography lessons and social studies. The children were expected to line up quietly and “transition” between classes without goofing around. This posed a challenge — hence the medication."


Japanese Education Today: Time to Move On - Society | Culture - japanechoweb: "So people in Japan today rate high schools, both public and private, according to their success at getting students into prestigious, high-score colleges, which are seen as the route to getting good jobs after graduation. And the same thinking is applied to elementary and junior high schools. But the underlying structure of employment based on academic background is now beginning to break down in the face of changes in contemporary society, where the forces of globalization are at work."




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